Eleventh Hour Gifts Without Shopping

Eleventh Hour Gifts Without Shopping

If you’re beginning to feel the pressure of running out of time to find the perfect gift, here are a few suggestions that may not be on their “list” but will certainly be appreciated.The perfect gift-300.png

The gift of really listening without interrupting, daydreaming or planning your response can be exactly what people want when they have something important to say.

The gift of affection with appropriate hugs, kisses and pats on the back can demonstrate your love for family and friends better than words.

The gift of laughter by sharing articles, cartoons and funny stories will say “I love to laugh with you.”

The gift of a simple, written note shows sincerity and real heartfelt sentiment that may be remembered for a lifetime and could even change a life.

The gift of a sincere compliment supports a person’s need to be accepted and appreciated. “You look great in that color”, “That was outstanding” or “I really enjoyed that” can make someone’s day.

The gift of random kindness or good deeds like holding a door or allowing someone to move ahead of you in a checkout lane shows respect for others.

Your smile, however, may be your most rewarding gift. Invariably, the person receiving the smile will in turn, smile back. The gift you gave will now be given back to you. It will be the right size and you can always use one more smile.

Til next time… May all your deals be easy ones!
Follow me on Twitter @yourmendorealty

Clint Hanks                                   707-391-6000

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Is the Market Turning?

At the time I’m writing this, it appears the market is cresting. We have had a pretty considerable increase in property values for the past five years. The growth hasn’t been overheated or exorbitant, but is has been steady, representing about a 50 percent increase from the lowest 2008 Recession values.

What does that mean for you? If you want to sell, now is still a good time. Keep in mind that if you sell at a slightly diminished price, you’ll also buy at a slightly diminished price, so it all comes out in the wash. The factor that makes this a great market (for buyers and sellers) is the continued low interest rates. I know I sound like a broken record when I talk about how incredible these interest rates are, but if you compare today’s rates against historical averages, you’ll see today’s rates are a bargain and I don’t think they’re going to last.

I know I’ve been saying rates are going to rise for several years now, but according to my crystal ball, I’m right this time. I can tell you, as a lender, I try to keep my loans to a maturity of five years or less. While I expect an increase in rates, the entire increase will not occur in the span of a few months. So, if you have an opportunity to buy real estate with the intention of holding it for a more than a few years, and you purchase it with long-term, fixed-rate financing, I believe you’ll be happy.

I am not recommending you throw reason out the window and buy whatever is available. I am suggesting that if you find a property you like for a price you can afford and feel good about, the benefits of home ownership and/or real estate investment are worthwhile.

So, as the market shifts from a seller’s market (average time a residential property remains on the market is less than 90 days) to a buyer’s market (average time on the market is more than 90 days), remember buyers and sellers are still interested in making transactions happen. If you’re a seller, it can be tempting to list your house for what it was worth a few months ago, but don’t. Overpricing your house will actually result in a lower sales price most of the time.

If you overprice your house, several things happen. First, buyers who could afford your house if it were priced properly won’t even schedule a walk-through. Buyers who are working with a good Realtor will also avoid your property, because most Realtors can spot an overpriced house a mile away.

Second, as your house sits on the market, people see the listing week after week and may assume there’s something wrong with it. Before buyers make an offer, they often ask, “How long has the house been on the market?” If it’s a new listing, they may assume they have to make a great offer or it will be snatched up by somebody else. If it’s been on the market a long time, they may believe you’re desperate to sell—putting them in the driver’s seat.

Finally, even if you find a buyer willing to pay too much, they may not be able to get financing. If your house appraises for less than the sales price, the bank probably won’t loan the buyer the money they need to complete the transaction.

To combat all these factors, sellers who overprice their houses at the outset end up reducing the price to below market value, reducing their revenue from the sale. So, the moral of the story is, don’t be greedy or you’ll lose out.

If you have questions about real estate or property management, please contact me at rselzer@selzerrealty.com or visit www.realtyworldselzer.com. If I use your suggestion in a column, I’ll send you a $5.00 gift card to Schat’s Bakery. If you’d like to read previous articles, visit my blog at www.richardselzer.com. Dick Selzer is a real estate broker who has been in the business for more than 40 years.

 

Don’t Pat Yourself on the Back Just Yet

Don’t Pat Yourself on the Back Just Yet

You’ve got $500,000 in liquid assets for your retirement and you’re still 15 years away. All your bills are paid; you have a small mortgage on your home; cars are paid for and great credit. Don’t break your arm patting yourself on the back yet.31001231_s.jpg

People think more about what they’re going to do when they retire than whether they’ll have the funds to do them. Ask anyone who has retired, it takes more money than you thought it did. Let’s look at a hypothetical situation.

To retire with $125,000 income in today’s dollars with a life expectancy of 25 years after retirement, you’ll need to have a net worth of $1.5 million at retirement including what Social Security may provide. Your $500,000 will grow to $1,045,420 in 15 years which will leave you about a half million short. You’ll need to save $24,149 each year for the next 15 years to reach your goal.

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Is this surprising? Did you imagine that this example would be that far from its goal? It might seem staggering to save $24,000 each year but there is another way…investing in rentals.

Real estate over the long term has proven to be a solid, predictable investment.  Cash flows, appreciation, equity buildup and tax advantages are the components that contribute to the rate of return. Increasing rents, available financing and solid appreciation make rentals particularly attractive in today’s environment.

Call me at (707) 467-3693 to find out more about how rental homes can help you reach your retirement goals.

Til next time… May all your deals be easy ones!
Follow me on Twitter @yourmendorealty

Clint Hanks                                   707-391-6000

The post Don’t Pat Yourself on the Back Just Yet appeared first on Clint Hanks, 707-467-3693.

Ukiah Business Trends

You may have noticed that we finally have some new businesses in town. The old Masonite property north of town, developed by Ross Liberty, has attracted a landscaping supply company, Rhys Vineyards, and a potential hotel, restaurant, and gas station. The landscape business is especially noteworthy because the owner is from Ukiah. Years ago, he got so fed up with local regulations that he moved his business to Cloverdale; now he is coming back. On the other side of town, Costco has broken ground and plans to open its retail store and gas station in the spring. In addition, a new hotel is proposed near the Costco site.

What does all this mean? It means the county’s economic development efforts are starting to pay off. We’re headed in the right direction. Businesses outside Mendocino County are beginning to see us as more receptive to new business.

While the county hasn’t relaxed regulations, there’s been a tremendous change in attitude. County supervisors, CEO Carmel Angelo, Assistant CEO Steve Dunnicliff, Interim Director of Planning and Development Nash Gonzalez and others have bent over backward to make sure no unnecessary impediments or restrictions are placed on new businesses—even in the face of new state regulations.

As consumers, we can expect more choices about where to spend our money, and more choice is almost always a good thing. It generally means broader selection and lower prices. Even if you never shop at Costco, when it opens, you can expect gas prices all over town to drop.

As taxpayers, this uptick in new businesses will provide a broader and more dependable source of funding for city and county governments to pay for much-needed services like roads, a new mental health facility, and the ever-increasing demands for all sorts of other services.

This new source of revenue will be needed in the wake of marijuana legalization, as the property tax base for marijuana-growing property decreases. The economic impact of diminished marijuana dollars will affect local businesses—everything from car dealerships to restaurants.

If my prediction is right, a few years from now, we’ll see less of the underground economy that currently props up our valley, and more of a conventional economy, where restaurants will see less cash and more credit card sales, and car dealers will see more sales paid for with bank loans or checks, as opposed to buyers peeling off $100 bills that smell funny. Our labor market will shift from cash-under-the-table to payroll checks, with all the attendant costs and benefits, whether it be taxes or paid health care.

With this uptick in business activity, there will be more of an opportunity for those of us in the financial and service industries as well. People coming to town to work at Costco or the other businesses I mentioned will need local services, will shop in local stores, and will need to buy or rent housing.

It’s an old expression, but very true: a rising tide raises all ships. Certainly, for those of us in the real estate business, there is opportunity on the horizon. The purchase and sale of commercial buildings and residential properties, as well as an increase in property management, is almost a certainty.

I look forward to the economic growth I see coming our way.

If you have questions about getting into real estate, please contact me at rselzer@selzerrealty.com or call (707) 462-4000. If you’d like to read previous articles, visit my blog at www.richardselzer.com. Dick Selzer is a real estate broker who has been in the business for more than 40 years.

 

The Pros and Cons of Downsizing

Once the kids go off to college and then (hopefully) into the work world, empty nesters typically have more house than they need. The question becomes whether to sell or stay put.

Let’s imagine you have a 3500-square-foot house. Now that your five adult children have families of their own, they visit from time to time but have no plans to come back and live with you.

A 3500-square-foot house is a lot to take care of and if it’s located a few miles from town, it’s not as convenient as a nice little place on the Westside of Ukiah, for example. If you sold your big house, you could move into town—into a neighborhood with tree-lined streets that are perfect for evening walks. You could be closer to shopping and other amenities, like Sundays in the Park concerts, the weekly Farmers Market, and your doctor’s office. And you could choose a property that would require substantially less yard work than your current one.

And convenience is only one of the possible benefits. Selling your house and buying a smaller one could be a smart financial move. Cash from the sale of your 3500-square-foot house could be used to pay for the new, smaller house, and you’d have money left over to supplement your retirement income. For the holidays, instead of staying at home (since things would be a little crowded), you could meet kids and grandkids at Disneyland or Yosemite or take a cruise to Mexico. As you can see, the benefits of downsizing are many.

However, as the father of five grown children, the thing that stops me from downsizing is the thought of losing our gathering place. I want all my kids to come home for holidays and birthdays and weekend barbecues. I want them to be able to show their children the room they grew up in, the tree they loved to climb, the fence they painted, and the back door they snuck out of when they thought no one was looking.

If I move, I lose all that. I love thinking about my children having children of their own and bringing them to my house where there’s plenty of room to run around. If it means I need to do a little extra landscaping, so be it.

The decision to downsize is a personal one, and it’s influenced by your financial resources as well as your emotional connection to your house. Sometimes, when people have experienced difficult, emotional family situations like a divorce or a death in the family, it can be easier to start over with a new house.

If you downsize, you will not only lower your mortgage payment, but you’ll also reduce the cost of maintaining your home. You may recall from previous articles, most people spend about 3 percent of the home value per year on taxes, insurance, repairs, and maintenance. If you were to downsize from a $700,000 house to a $400,000 house, you’d save on mortgage interest, plus several hundred dollars per month on house-related expenses.

If you decide to downsize, and you stay within the county, you can bring your tax base with you if that’s financially beneficial for you. If you bought your home twenty or thirty years ago, your original tax base is likely to be below the $400,000 value of the smaller house you’d move into. The lower your tax base, the lower your taxes.

Talk to your accountant about the financial benefits of downsizing, and if it’s the right move, call your Realtor to help you put your home on the market. Then, pour yourself a cup of coffee and start thinking about whether you’d rather go to Disneyland or Mexico for Christmas.

If you have questions about real estate or property management, contact me at rselzer@selzerrealty.com or visit www.realtyworldselzer.com. If I use your suggestion in a column, I’ll send you’re a $5.00 gift card to Schat’s Bakery. If you’d like to read previous articles, visit my blog at www.richardselzer.com. Dick Selzer is a real estate broker who has been in the business in Ukiah for more than 40 years.